Can I take Tranexamic Acid while breastfeeding?

Amounts of tranexamic acid in breastmilk appear to be low. Although an international consensus panel recommended against using tranexamic acid during breastfeeding,[1] a subsequent controlled study found no adverse outcomes among breastfed infants whose mothers took tranexamic acid in dosages up to 4 grams daily during breastfeeding. If tranexamic acid is required by a mother, it is not a reason to discontinue breastfeeding; however, until more data become available, medical supervision and follow-up of the breastfed infant is recommended.[2]

Drug levels

Maternal Levels. Unpublished data from the manufacturer indicates that the concentration of tranexamic acid in breastmilk is 1% of the peak serum concentration 1 hour after the last dose of a 2-day treatment course.[3] Further details of the study have not been published. Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects in breastfed infants

Maternal Levels. Unpublished data from the manufacturer indicates that the concentration of tranexamic acid in breastmilk is 1% of the peak serum concentration 1 hour after the last dose of a 2-day treatment course.[3] Further details of the study have not been published. Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Possible effects on lactation

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

References

1. Caballero T, Farkas H, Bouillet L et al. International consensus and practical guidelines on the gynecologic and obstetric management of female patients with hereditary angioedema caused by C1 inhibitor deficiency. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2012;129:308-20. PMID: 22197274

2. Gilad O, Merlob P, Stahl B, Klinger G. Outcome following tranexamic acid exposure during breastfeeding. Breastfeed Med. 2014;9:411-2. PMID: 25025926

3. Verstraete M. Clinical application of inhibitors of fibrinolysis. Drugs. 1985;29:236-61. PMID: 2580684

Last Revision Date

20141107

Disclaimer:Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

Source: LactMed – National Library of Medicine (NLM)

3D Model of the Tranexamic Acid molecule

MolView – data visualization platform