Also known as Oxpentifylline, PTX, Pentoxifilina, Pentoxifyllin, Pentoxifyllinum, Pentoxil, Pentoxyphylline, Trental

A methylxanthine derivative with hemorrheologic and immunomodulating properties. Pentoxifylline inhibits phosphodiesterase, resulting in increased levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in erythrocytes, endothelium, and the surrounding tissues. This leads to vasodilation, improves erythrocyte flexibility, and enhances blood flow. In addition, the increased level of cAMP in platelets inhibits platelet aggregation, which may contribute to a reduction in blood viscosity. This agent also inhibits production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, while it induces Th2-like (T-helper 2) cytokine production, thereby inhibiting Th1-mediated (T-helper 1) inflammatory and autoimmune responses.

Originator: NCI Thesaurus | Source: The website of the National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov)

Can I take Pentoxifylline while breastfeeding?

Limited data indicate that pentoxifylline is poorly excreted into breastmilk. It would not be expected to cause any adverse effects in breastfed infants, especially if the infant is older than 2 months.

Drug levels

Maternal Levels. Five women who had been breastfeeding for at least 6 weeks received a single 400 mg oral dose of a sustained-release form of pentoxifylline. The average total milk concentration of pentoxifylline plus its 3 active metabolites was 419 mcg/L at 2 hours after the dose and 982 mcg/L at 4 hours.[1] Using the peak milk level data from this study, an exclusively breastfed infant would receive an estimated maximum of 147 mcg/kg daily with this maternal dosage regimen or about 2% of the maternal weight-adjusted dosage. Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects in breastfed infants

Maternal Levels. Five women who had been breastfeeding for at least 6 weeks received a single 400 mg oral dose of a sustained-release form of pentoxifylline. The average total milk concentration of pentoxifylline plus its 3 active metabolites was 419 mcg/L at 2 hours after the dose and 982 mcg/L at 4 hours.[1] Using the peak milk level data from this study, an exclusively breastfed infant would receive an estimated maximum of 147 mcg/kg daily with this maternal dosage regimen or about 2% of the maternal weight-adjusted dosage. Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Possible effects on lactation

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

References

1. Witter FR, Smith RV. The excretion of pentoxifylline and its metabolites into human breast milk. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1985;151:1094-7. PMID: 3985069

Last Revision Date

20130907

Disclaimer:Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

Source: LactMed – National Library of Medicine (NLM)

3D Model of the Pentoxifylline molecule

MolView – data visualization platform