Also known as Zofran ODT

A carbazole derivative with antiemetic activity. As a selective serotonin receptor antagonist, ondansetron competitively blocks the action of serotonin at 5HT3 receptors, resulting in suppression of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. (NCI04)

Originator: NCI Thesaurus | Source: The website of the National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov)

Can I take Ondansetron while breastfeeding?

Little published information is available on the clinical use of ondansetron during breastfeeding, although it is apparently frequently used for nausea after cesarean section, usually in doses of 4 to 8 mg intravenously.[1][2] No adverse infant effects have been reported and the drug has been used in infants.[3] If ondansetron is required by the mother, it is not a reason to discontinue breastfeeding; however an alternate drug may be preferred, especially while nursing a newborn or preterm infant.[4]

Drug levels

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects in breastfed infants

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Possible effects on lactation

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Alternate drugs to consider

Metoclopramide, Prochlorperazine

References

1. Smith I. Ondansetron after Caesarian section. Author response. Br J Anaesth. 2001;87:943. PMID: 11878706

2. Suppa E, Valente A, Catarci S et al. A study of low-dose S-ketamine infusion as “preventive” pain treatment for cesarean section with spinal anesthesia: Benefits and side effects. Minerva Anestesiol. 2012;78:774-81. PMID: 22374377

3. Elkomy MH, Sultan P, Carvalho B et al. Ondansetron pharmacokinetics in pregnant women and neonates: Towards a new treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome. Clin Pharmacol Ther. 2015;97:167-76. PMID: 25670522

4. Cassina M, Di Gianantonio E, Toldo I et al. Migraine therapy during pregnancy and lactation. Expert Opin Drug Saf. 2010;9:937-48. PMID: 20662551

Last Revision Date

20160401

Disclaimer:Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

Source: LactMed – National Library of Medicine (NLM)

3D Model of the Ondansetron molecule

MolView – data visualization platform