Also known as (R)-Norepinephrine, Arterenol, Nor-adrenaline, Noradrenaline, Norepinefrina, Norepinephrinum, l-Arterenol, l-Noradrenaline, l-Norepinephrine

A naturally occurring catecholamine hormone that functions as a neurotransmitter in the sympathetic nervous system. Norepinephrine directly stimulates adrenergic receptors. Stimulation of alpha-adrenergic receptors causes vasoconstriction of the radial smooth muscle of the iris, arteries, arterioles, veins, urinary bladder, and the sphincter of the gastrointestinal tract. Stimulation of beta-1 adrenergic receptors causes an increase in myocardial contractility, heart rate, automaticity, and atrioventricular (AV) conduction while stimulation of beta-2 adrenergic receptors causes bronchiolar and vascular smooth muscle dilatation.

Originator: NCI Thesaurus | Source: The website of the National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov)

Can I take Norepinephrine while breastfeeding?

No information is available on the use of norepinephrine during breastfeeding. Because of its poor oral bioavailability and short half-life, any norepinephrine in milk is unlikely to affect the infant. High intravenous doses of norepinephrine might reduce milk production or milk letdown.

Drug levels

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects in breastfed infants

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Possible effects on lactation

Relevant published information in nursing mothers was not found as of the revision date. Animal data indicate that norepinephrine can decrease serum prolactin and reduce milk production,[1] as well as inhibit the release of oxytocin, which inhibits milk ejection.[2]

References

1. Thomas GB, Cummins JT, Doughton BW et al. Direct pituitary inhibition of prolactin secretion by dopamine and noradrenaline in sheep. J Endocrinol. 1989;123:393-402. PMID: 2607250

2. Song SL, Crowley WR, Grosvenor CE. Evidence for involvement of an adrenal catecholamine in the beta-adrenergic inhibition of oxytocin release in lactating rats. Brain Res. 1988;457:303-9. PMID: 2851365

Last Revision Date

20151001

Disclaimer:Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

Source: LactMed – National Library of Medicine (NLM)

3D Model of the Norepinephrine molecule

MolView – data visualization platform