Also known as , IMC-11F8, Portrazza

A fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) with potential antineoplastic activity. Necitumumab binds to and blocks the ligand binding site of EGFR, thereby preventing the activation and subsequent dimerization of the receptor. This may lead to an inhibition of EGFR-dependent downstream pathways and so inhibition of EGFR-dependent tumor cell proliferation and metastasis. EGFR, a member of the epidermal growth factor family of extracellular protein ligands, may be overexpressed on the cell surfaces of various tumor cell types.

Originator: NCI Thesaurus | Source: The website of the National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov)

Can I take Necitumumab while breastfeeding?

No information is available on the clinical use of necitumumab during breastfeeding. Because necitumumab is a large protein molecule with a molecular weight of 145,000, the amount in milk is likely to be very low and absorption is unlikely because it is probably destroyed in the infant’s gastrointestinal tract. However, the manufacturer recommends that women receiving necitumumab should not breastfeed during therapy or for 3 months following the final dose.

Drug levels

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects in breastfed infants

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Possible effects on lactation

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

References

Last Revision Date

20151210

Disclaimer:Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

Source: LactMed – National Library of Medicine (NLM)