Also known as AG 1749, Bamalite, Lansoprazol, Lansoprazolum, Lanzol, Lanzopral, Lanzul, Limpidex, Monolitum, Ogastro, Opiren, Prevacid

A substituted benzimidazole prodrug with selective and irreversible proton pump inhibitor activity. Lansoprazole prodrug is converted to an active sulfonamide derivative in the acidic environment of the gastric parietal cell; the sulfonamide derivative binds to the gastric proton pump H+/K+ ATPase and forms a stable disulfide bond with the sulfhydryl group near the potassium-binding site on the luminal side, resulting in inactivation of the ATPase and a reduction in gastric acid secretion. This agent does not have anticholinergic or histamine H2 -receptor antagonistic properties.

Originator: NCI Thesaurus | Source: The website of the National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov)

Can I take Lansoprazole while breastfeeding?

No information is available on the use of lansoprazole during breastfeeding. However, lansoprazole has been used safely in newborn infants, so it is unlikely that the amount in breastmilk would be harmful.

Drug levels

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects in breastfed infants

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Possible effects on lactation

One case of elevated serum prolactin and galactorrhea was reported in a 21-year-old man. When omeprazole was substituted for lansoprazole, the serum prolactin decreased to the normal range and galactorrhea ceased.[1]

A 13-year-old girl with a recent history of bilateral galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia from omeprazole and domperidone on separate occasions was given lansoprazole to prevent gastrointestinal irritation following intravenous diclofenac for a severe headache. After 3 days of lansoprazole therapy, she again developed galactorrhea and an elevated serum prolactin that returned to normal a week after discontinuing lansoprazole.[2]

Alternate drugs to consider

Cimetidine, Famotidine, Nizatidine, Omeprazole, Pantoprazole, Ranitidine, Sucralfate

References

1. Izquierdo Prieto OM, Moreno Alia E, Rosillo Gonzalez A. [Galactorrhea induced by lansoprazole]. Aten Primaria. 2004;34:325-6. PMID: 15491529

2. Jabbar A, Khan R, Farrukh SN. Hyperprolactinaemia induced by proton pump inhibitor. J Pak Med Assoc. 2010;60:689-90. PMID: 20726208

Last Revision Date

20150331

Disclaimer:Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

Source: LactMed – National Library of Medicine (NLM)

3D Model of the Lansoprazole molecule

MolView – data visualization platform