Also known as Carbamohydroxamic Acid, Carbamohydroximic Acid, Carbamoyl Oxime, Carbamyl Hydroxamate, Droxia, Hidroxicarbamida, Hydrea, Hydroxycarbamid, Hydroxycarbamide, Hydroxycarbamidum, Hydroxyharnstoff, Hydroxyurea, Litalir, N-Carbamoylhydroxylamine, N-Hydroxyurea, Onco-Carbide, Oncocarbide, Oxeron, Oxyurea, SQ 1089, SQ-1089, Syrea, WR 83799

A monohydroxyl-substituted urea (hydroxycarbamate) antimetabolite. Hydroxyurea selectively inhibits ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase, an enzyme required to convert ribonucleoside diphosphates into deoxyribonucleoside diphosphates, thereby preventing cells from leaving the G1/S phase of the cell cycle. This agent also exhibits radiosensitizing activity by maintaining cells in the radiation-sensitive G1 phase and interfering with DNA repair. (NCI04)

Originator: NCI Thesaurus | Source: The website of the National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov)

Can I take Hydroxyurea while breastfeeding?

Most sources consider breastfeeding to be contraindicated during maternal antineoplastic drug therapy, although the evidence for this recommendation is very weak.[1][2] Although only minimal data are available to determine an appropriate period to withhold breastfeeding, the drug’s terminal half-live of 4.5 hours with normal kidney function suggests that withholding breastfeeding for at least 24 hours may be sufficient for patients receiving intermittent therapy. This period may be longer in patients with impaired kidney function. Chemotherapy may adversely affect the normal microbiome and chemical makeup of breastmilk.[3]

Drug levels

Maternal Levels. A mother was taking 500 mg of hydroxyurea orally three times a day. Milk samples taken 2 hours after the last dose of each day on 3 days averaged 6.1 mg/L (range 3.8 to 8.4 mg/L). Using these data, the infant in this case would have received less than 4% of maternal weight-adjusted dosage.[4]

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects in breastfed infants

Maternal Levels. A mother was taking 500 mg of hydroxyurea orally three times a day. Milk samples taken 2 hours after the last dose of each day on 3 days averaged 6.1 mg/L (range 3.8 to 8.4 mg/L). Using these data, the infant in this case would have received less than 4% of maternal weight-adjusted dosage.[4]

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Possible effects on lactation

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

References

1. Pistilli B, Bellettini G, Giovannetti E et al. Chemotherapy, targeted agents, antiemetics and growth-factors in human milk: How should we counsel cancer patients about breastfeeding? Cancer Treat Rev. 2013;39:207-11. PMID: 23199900

2. National Institutes of Health. National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. Evidence-based management of sickle cell disease. Expert panel report. 2014.

3. Urbaniak C, McMillan A, Angelini M et al. Effect of chemotherapy on the microbiota and metabolome of human milk, a case report. Microbiome. 2014;2 :24. PMID: 25061513

4. Sylvester RK, Lobell M, Teresi ME et al. Excretion of hydroxyurea into milk. Cancer. 1987;60:2177-8. PMID: 3481556

Last Revision Date

20160204

Disclaimer:Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

Source: LactMed – National Library of Medicine (NLM)

3D Model of the Hydroxyurea molecule

MolView – data visualization platform