Also known as FNF, Fenofibrato, Fenofibratum, Fenofibric acid, Finofibrate, Lofibra, Procetofen, TriCor

A synthetic phenoxy-isobutyric acid derivate and prodrug with antihyperlipidemic activity. Fenofibrate is hydrolyzed in vivo to its active metabolite fenofibric acid that binds to and activates peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha), resulting in the activation of lipoprotein lipase and reduction of the production of apoprotein C-III, an inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase activity. Increased lipolysis and a fall in plasma triglycerides, in turn, leads to the modification of the small, dense low density lipoporotein (LDL) particles into larger particles that are catabolized more rapidly due to a greater affinity for cholesterol receptors. In addition, activation of PPARalpha also increases the synthesis of apoproteins A-I, A-II, and high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. Overall, fenofibrate reduces total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, total triglycerides and triglyceride rich lipoprotein (VLDL) while increasing HDL cholesterol.

Originator: NCI Thesaurus | Source: The website of the National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov)

Can I take Fenofibrate while breastfeeding?

No relevant published information exists on the use of fenofibrate during breastfeeding. Because of a concern with disruption of infant lipid metabolism, fenofibrate is best avoided during breastfeeding. An alternate drug is preferred, especially while nursing a newborn or preterm infant.

Drug levels

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects in breastfed infants

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Possible effects on lactation

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Alternate drugs to consider

Colesevelam, Colestipol

References

Last Revision Date

20131206

Disclaimer:Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

Source: LactMed – National Library of Medicine (NLM)

3D Model of the Fenofibrate molecule

MolView – data visualization platform