Also known as Ezedoc, Ezetimiba, Ezetimibum, Ezetrol, Zetia

An azetidinone derivative and a cholesterol absorption inhibitor with lipid-lowering activity. Ezetimibe appears to interact physically with cholesterol transporters at the brush border of the small intestine and inhibits the intestinal absorption of cholesterol and related phytosterols. As a result, ezetimibe causes a decrease in the level of blood cholesterol or an increase in the clearance of cholesterol from the bloodstream. Overall, the following effects observed are a reduction of hepatic cholesterol stores and a reduction of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and other triglycerides in the blood.

Originator: NCI Thesaurus | Source: The website of the National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov)

Can I take Ezetimibe while breastfeeding?

No relevant published information exists on the use of ezetimibe during breastfeeding. Because of a concern with disruption of infant lipid metabolism, ezetimibe is best avoided during breastfeeding. An alternate drug is preferred, especially while nursing a newborn or preterm infant. Ezetimibe treatment in combination with a statin (e.g., atorvastatin, simvastatin) should be avoided in nursing mothers.

Drug levels

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Effects in breastfed infants

Maternal Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Infant Levels. Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

Possible effects on lactation

Relevant published information was not found as of the revision date.

References

Last Revision Date

20131206

Disclaimer:Information presented in this database is not meant as a substitute for professional judgment. You should consult your healthcare provider for breastfeeding advice related to your particular situation. The U.S. government does not warrant or assume any liability or responsibility for the accuracy or completeness of the information on this Site.

Source: LactMed – National Library of Medicine (NLM)